December 26, 2017

Federal Gun Law Debate Could Impact Indiana Legislation

Article origination IPBS-RJC
Indiana legislative leaders say a debate in Congress over what’s called “concealed carry reciprocity” could have an impact on discussion in the General Assembly. The federal bill would mean a gun license in one state would be valid in any other state, even those with stricter regulations. Meanwhile, Indiana lawmakers wrestle with whether to eliminate the need for Hoosiers to have a license to carry a handgun in public. Sen. Travis Holdman (R-Markle) says the federal discussion changes the  - IPBS-RJC

Indiana legislative leaders say a debate in Congress over what’s called “concealed carry reciprocity” could have an impact on discussion in the General Assembly. The federal bill would mean a gun license in one state would be valid in any other state, even those with stricter regulations. Meanwhile, Indiana lawmakers wrestle with whether to eliminate the need for Hoosiers to have a license to carry a handgun in public. Sen. Travis Holdman (R-Markle) says the federal discussion changes the

IPBS-RJC

Indiana legislative leaders say a debate in Congress over what’s called “concealed carry reciprocity” could have an impact on discussion in the General Assembly.

The federal bill would mean a gun license in one state would be valid in any other state, even those with stricter regulations. Meanwhile, Indiana lawmakers wrestle with whether to eliminate the need for Hoosiers to have a license to carry a handgun in public.

Sen. Travis Holdman (R-Markle) says the federal discussion changes the state’s.

“What’s that mean to Indiana if a Texas resident comes here and says, ‘I have a Texas permit, or I don’t need one in Texas so I don’t need one in Indiana,’” Holdman says.

Law enforcement groups oppose the change to Indiana’s law, which has given some Republican leaders – including Speaker Brian Bosma (R-Indianapolis) – doubts about the measure. Mike Downs Center for Indiana Politics Director Andrew Downs says the federal debate gives Hoosiers GOP leaders “an out.”

“He could always say, ‘Hey, there’s no point in us doing this – the feds are dealing with it. Let’s wait and see what they come up with,’” Downs says.

The session begins Jan. 3.

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