NewsLocal News / January 2, 2014

Fitness Resolutions Could Mean Healthier Finances For Indiana

Sam Klemet
Fitness Resolutions Could Mean Healthier Finances For Indiana

As the calendar turns to 2014, many Hoosiers are committing to getting fit.

Gyms tend to be packed in January with people who have made resolutions to get into better shape.

Sticking to that resolution is not only important for physical well-being, but financial stability, as well. 

"When you look at just diabetes alone, that is a potential $6 billion problem that we have in the state and that's just one aspect of it," said Executive Director of the Wellness Council of Indiana, Chuck Gillespie.  "As you get more people who are carrying more weight, especially as they get older, you are now talking about some soft tissue type issues.  So, now you are dealing with workers compensation problems and areas where people quite frankly cannot do their jobs because they are physically not able."

He says those who make resolutions need to set realistic expectations. 

"Do things that you know you can do," said Gillespie.  "I think from a physical activity perspective it's not 'let's go to the gym seven days a week,' that's not realistic, especially if you haven't been to the gym for six months.  But, how about, turn off the TV for one hour and go outside and do some work around the house."

Nearly a third of Hoosiers are considered obese, which ranks eighth worst in the country.  Obesity rates in Indiana have risen four percent in the past four years. 

Gillespie says to start, people can do less sitting.

"Sitting is the new smoking. Sitting is what is going to kill us now," he said.  "If you spend more than eight hours in a given day sitting, without physical activity, your chances of death increase between 10 and 50 percent."

 

 

 

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