NewsLocal News / July 2, 2014

Is There A Story In Your Neighborhood Waiting To Be Told?

We’re living in a time in Indianapolis where many of our neighborhoods are in a state of change.

In the news, we hear from neighborhood leaders when there’s a festival or event, from the city when a new policing initiative is announced, and from people on the street after a major crime has taken place. And while these items are important, we know they don’t tell the whole story. 

That’s why this summer WFYI news partnered with local freelance journalist Andrea Muraskin and American Public Media’s Public Insight Network (PIN) to produce a radio series on our city’s changing neighborhoods. And we tried something new: the ideas for this series came from listeners.

Submissions to the project are now closed. (We’ve received almost 70 of them, and we’re thrilled.) Many submitters allowed us to make their insights public. Click over to Andrea’s page on the PIN to learn about trends, concerns and points of pride related by neighbors all over town. By the way, even though submissions for this project have closed, you can still join the PIN and become a potential source for local and national news.

The conversation continues on the Neighborhood Project Facebook page. You can also tweet us at @WFYINews and @Andrea_Muraskin, #indyneighbors.

On Sept. 23, 2014 Indy’s changing neighborhoods was the topic of discussion on our local call-in program, No Limits. For questions about the series, contact News Manager Michelle Johnson at  

Please share this page with your friends, family, and neighbors. The more participation we have, the more we can learn about our city, and the richer our reporting will be..

The Neighborhood Project Series

Part 1: Better, Block By Block

On a recent Saturday, the intersection of 46th and Evanston streets came alive. Local merchants moved in for a day, alongside nonprofits like Keep Indianapolis Beautiful. Temporary AstroTurf medians were laid down on 46th Street, and drivers slowed down; some even honked and waved.  A DJ played hip hop and R&B.

Part 2: In Garfield Park, Neighborhood Power Is Key

Neighbors in the Garfield Park neighborhood fought the opening of a charter school earlier this year, and are carefully ‒ and doggedly ‒ working to engineer the kind of future they want for the neighborhood.

Part 3: Public Safety, Perception and Pluck on the Westside

How does a rough neighborhood turn a corner? And when? As part of the Neighborhood Project, reporter Andrea Muraskin spent time in the Near Westside. she found that, when it comes to public safety, perception is powerful.

Part 4: Race History Factors Into Rebuilding A Front Porch Neighborhood

For more than a decade, newcomers have been moving to Zone 2 of the Meridian-Kessler nighborhood. According to Census data, the zone was 85 percent black and 11 percent white in 2000. In 2012, blacks made up just 63 percent of the population, and whites 27 percent. Now, a dialogue on race may be necessary to rebuild a sense of community.