December 9, 2020

AG Hill Wants Supreme Court To Hear Lawsuit Aiming To Overturn 2020 Presidential Election

Article origination IPBS-RJC
Attorney General Curtis Hill, right, and President Donald Trump meet at the White House in 2017. - Courtesy of the Attorney General's office

Attorney General Curtis Hill, right, and President Donald Trump meet at the White House in 2017.

Courtesy of the Attorney General's office

Attorney General Curtis Hill wants the U.S. Supreme Court to consider a lawsuit filed by the Texas attorney general that seeks to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election.

That comes a day after Attorney General-elect Todd Rokita also urged the nation’s high court to hear the case.

The Texas suit aims to block results in four battleground states: Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

The lawsuit relies on evidence that has been rejected by other courts at both the federal and state levels across the country.

In a statement, Hill said by taking the case, the Supreme Court would help “ensure the integrity” of the election. And in Rokita’s statement, the incoming Republican officeholder claimed “millions” of Hoosiers have “deep concerns about the conduct of the 2020 Presidential election.”

Numerous officials – including U.S. Attorney General Bill Barr – say there is no evidence of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 election.

Three U.S. representatives from Indiana have also signed on to a brief asking the Court to take the Texas case: Rep. Jim Banks (R-Columbia City), Rep. Jim Baird (R-Greencastle) and Rep. Trey Hollingsworth (R-Jeffersonville).

This story has been updated.

Contact reporter Brandon at bsmith@ipbs.org or follow him on Twitter at @brandonjsmith5.

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