April 25, 2016

Agricultural Experts: Indiana's Cold Snap Didn't Hurt Crops

A ten-day cold snap in early April, threatened fruit trees that had already started to bud. - Rainer Rillke,CC-BY-SA-3.0

A ten-day cold snap in early April, threatened fruit trees that had already started to bud.

Rainer Rillke,CC-BY-SA-3.0

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP) — Purdue agricultural experts say Indiana's winter wheat, forage and fruit crops appear to have survived cold weather earlier in April.

Temperatures fell below freezing throughout the state during a ten-day cold snap from April 2-12. Fruit trees had already started to bud in southern Indiana and the low temperatures brought fears of crop loss.

But extension specialists like Amanda Mosiman in Warrick County say while there was a little bit of damage there was nothing severe enough to reduce yield. Specialists say enough time has passed since the freeze that any damage would be noticeable.

The Indiana State Climate Office says temperatures rebounded quickly and have been at or above seasonal average. Forecasters say that could last through the rest of April, providing good conditions for planting.

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