January 20, 2022

All 92 Indiana counties reach top COVID-19 spread risk level

The county metrics map on the on the Indiana Department of Health's dashboard showed that as of Wednesday the entire state was in the highest-risk red category, which indicates very high community spread of COVID-19. - Indiana Department of Health

The county metrics map on the on the Indiana Department of Health's dashboard showed that as of Wednesday the entire state was in the highest-risk red category, which indicates very high community spread of COVID-19.

Indiana Department of Health

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — All 92 of Indiana's counties have reached the highest-risk level for COVID-19 spread for the first time since state health officials began releasing a statewide risk map during the pandemic.

Indiana’s color-coded coronavirus risk map on the Indiana Department of Health's dashboard showed that as of Wednesday the entire state was in the highest-risk red category, which indicates very high community spread of COVID-19.

That was up from 81 counties rated in the red category last week. Indiana previously had seen a peak of 73 of its 92 counties in the red category in January 2021. The state’s county-level risk level is updated each Wednesday.

The entire state entered the highest-risk category as the spread of the highly-contagious omicron variant continues, with that variant accounting for 74.3% of Indiana’s coronavirus cases recorded in January.

Indiana's hospitals had 3,492 people hospitalized as of Tuesday because of COVID-19. That's the state's second-highest total of COVID-19 hospitalizations, following a peak of 3,519 patients hospitalized for COVID-19 as of Jan. 13.

The health department reported another 118 deaths in Indiana from COVID-19 on Wednesday, reflecting deaths that occurred between mid-November and Tuesday. Those deaths raised Indiana's pandemic death toll to 20,500, including confirmed and presumed COVID-19 cases.

Indiana has averaged more than 50 such deaths a day since mid-December.

Support independent journalism today. You rely on WFYI to stay informed, and we depend on you to make our work possible. Donate to power our nonprofit reporting today. Give now.

 

 

Related News

Southern Indiana health officer to lead state EMS
Why some hospitals have stopped using race-based calculations for kidney disease
IU expert warns COVID pandemic not behind us yet