NewsPublic Affairs / October 8, 2018

Bloomington Leaders Proclaim Indigenous Peoples' Day At Rally

Bloomington Leaders Proclaim Indigenous Peoples' Day At RallyBloomington is the first city in the state to proclaim what many know as Columbus Day, Indigenous Peoples' Day.Indigenous Peoples’ Day, Bloomington, Columbus Day2018-10-08T00:00:00-04:00
Bloomington Leaders Proclaim Indigenous Peoples' Day At Rally

Organizer Caleb King leads the march to the county courthouse.

Joe Hren/WFIU-WTIU News

Indiana University’s Native American Student Organization thought they were planning a rally to recognize Indigenous Peoples’ day Monday.

But after an email from city officials, organizers learned the call to action would end up being a celebration.

Organizer Caleb King says he received word Friday that Bloomington would be the first city in the state to proclaim what many know as Columbus Day, Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

“I’m passionate about it because indigenous people deserve a right," King says. "This is our original homeland and while I’m from Alaska and my homeland is back there, we all work together and fight for each other.”

King says Indiana University has yet to recognize Indigenous Peoples’ day. The city of Bloomington changed the holiday name to Fall Holiday in 2016.

King says other cities should recognize the holiday considering Indiana means ‘land of the Indians.’

“But I also think it’s very exciting that this is the first city to do this in 2018. It’s two-fold. I would have a challenge to other cities, embrace this,” King says.

The celebration began at IU’s Dunn Meadow and ended with a march to the Monroe County Courthouse.

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