NewsPublic Affairs / November 23, 2020

Coronavirus Forcing Low Key Inaugural For Indiana Governor

Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb gets a high five from Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch after he addressed supporters after winning his second term as governor in Indianapolis, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020. - AP Photo/Michael Conroy

Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb gets a high five from Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch after he addressed supporters after winning his second term as governor in Indianapolis, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020.

AP Photo/Michael Conroy

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The start of Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb’s second term in January won’t include any large public celebrations because of coronavirus concerns, the head of the state Republican Party said Friday.

Holcomb won a landslide reelection this month for another four years in office. The Republican governor entered office in 2017 with an inaugural ball at the J.W. Marriott Hotel in downtown Indianapolis and an inauguration ceremony attended by about 2,000 people at the state fairgrounds coliseum.

“While we’d love to celebrate our historic victories together to usher in the second term of Governor Holcomb, the time just isn’t right to do so,” state Republican Chairman Kyle Hupfer said in a statement. “It remains our full intent to appropriately celebrate the governor’s reelection with the entire team that made it possible when circumstances allow.”

Indiana has faced steep increases in COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations and deaths over the past two months and Holcomb has imposed crowd size limits across the state aimed at slowing the coronavirus spread.

Holcomb and Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch will legally take their oaths of office at some point before their new terms begin Jan. 11.

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