NewsPublic Affairs / April 2, 2019

Democrat Mayor Pete Celebrates Raising $7 Million This Year

In this March 23, 2019, photo, South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg arrives to speak about his presidential run during the Democratic monthly breakfast at the Circle of Friends Community Center in Greenville, S.C.  - AP Photo/Richard Shiro

In this March 23, 2019, photo, South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg arrives to speak about his presidential run during the Democratic monthly breakfast at the Circle of Friends Community Center in Greenville, S.C.

AP Photo/Richard Shiro

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential contender Pete Buttigieg said Monday that he's raised more than $7 million this year.

The South Bend, Indiana, mayor tweeted his team's initial report early Monday, saying he and his supporters "are out-performing expectations at every turn."

Later Monday, he posted a video saying 158,550 donors had contributed to his campaign. He said 64 percent of the total raised came through contributions of less than $200.

"This is a great look for our first quarter," said Buttigieg, who launched his presidential exploratory committee two months ago.

California Sen. Kamala Harris said her presidential campaign has raised $12 million this year, from more than 218,000 individual contributions. Her campaign also touted its small-dollar fundraising operation, noting that 98 percent of contributions were under $100, and saying nearly all of her donors can donate again.

Former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke said he raised slightly more than $1 million over the weekend, achieving a fundraising goal.

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