January 9, 2024

Greg Pence not running for Congress again in 6th District

U.S. Rep. Greg Pence (R-6th District), standing, talks with constituents at a Chamber of Commerce lunch in Muncie in August 2019. - Stephanie Wiechmann

U.S. Rep. Greg Pence (R-6th District), standing, talks with constituents at a Chamber of Commerce lunch in Muncie in August 2019.

Stephanie Wiechmann

Sixth District U.S. Representative Greg Pence says he won’t run for re-election in 2024. He’s one of several incumbents who won’t continue on in the U.S. House of Representatives.

In a short statement, the conservative Republican owner of several antique malls said it was his experience as a Marine that led him to run, to serve his country again.

He said it has been a privilege to represent the district.

“In 2017, I ran for Congress because I was Ready to Serve Again,” he said. “As a former Marine Officer, I approached the job with purpose. After three terms, I’ve made the decision to not file for reelection.”

Pence will have served three terms in the U.S. House after winning a district once held for 12 years by his brother, former vice president and Indiana governor Mike Pence.

During his campaigns, Greg Pence gained a reputation for not responding to interview requests with local reporters. And after being evacuated from the Capitol with Vice President Pence during the Jan. 6 insurrection, he returned to the floor to vote against election results from Pennsylvania.

Pence says his legislative team will focus on constituent services for the rest of his term.

Pence is the fourth U.S. Representative who has indicated they won’t run for reelection in 2024, joining Jim Banks in the Third District, Victoria Spartz in the Fifth, and Larry Bucshon in the Eighth.

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