February 8, 2021

Highway Work Zone Speed Cameras Approved By House Committee

Original story from   IPBS-RJC

Article origination IPBS-RJC
Legislation would establish a pilot program that allows four highway work zone speed cameras around the state.  - thisisbossi/Flickr

Legislation would establish a pilot program that allows four highway work zone speed cameras around the state.

thisisbossi/Flickr

Indiana could put speed cameras in highway work zones under legislation unanimously approved by a House committee Monday.

The measure would allow speeding tickets for drivers caught by the cameras going at least 12 miles per hour over the limit. It would create a pilot program, allowing no more than four speed cameras in construction zones across the state. And the cameras could only be active when workers are present.

Indiana Constructors, Inc.'s Richard Hedgecock represents highway construction companies. He said the measure is about worker safety – but also the safety of motorists, who are seven times more likely to be injured in a construction zone than workers.

“Their right to safety is more important than the right not to be photographed while breaking the law and risking the lives of others,” Hedgecock said.

READ MORE: How Do I Follow Indiana's Legislative Session? Here's Your Guide To Demystify The Process

Join the conversation and sign up for the Indiana Two-Way. Text "Indiana" to 73224. Your comments and questions in response to our weekly text help us find the answers you need on COVID-19 and other statewide issues.

The bill, which allows a private company to run the cameras, would require police to review the photographs before a ticket is issued.

But Brad Hoffeditz, Indiana State Police legislative director, said he wants police kept out of it.

“Treat this like an administrative violation," Hoffeditz said. "Keep the courts out of it.”

The measure would allow $75 fines through the speed cameras – far less than the $300 minimum for speeding in a work zone when issued a ticket directly by law enforcement. Money from the fines would go to the State Police and the Indiana Department of Transportation.

Contact reporter Brandon at bsmith@ipbs.org or follow him on Twitter at @brandonjsmith5.

Support independent journalism today. You rely on WFYI to stay informed, and we depend on you to make our work possible. Donate to power our nonprofit reporting today. Give now.

 

 

Related News

Slain Indiana officer's fiancée recalls her life at funeral
Jupiter to be closest, brightest Monday night
Mayor awards certified vendor of the month to Liftoff Creamery