December 3, 2021

Holcomb says COVID-19 is 'going to be with us for a long time'

Gov. Eric Holcomb wants to end the state’s public health emergency, as long as lawmakers deliver him administrative changes that will ensure Hoosiers don’t lose access to hundreds of millions in federal dollars. - Brandon Smith/IPB News

Gov. Eric Holcomb wants to end the state’s public health emergency, as long as lawmakers deliver him administrative changes that will ensure Hoosiers don’t lose access to hundreds of millions in federal dollars.

Brandon Smith/IPB News

Gov. Eric Holcomb said he and other state officials are constantly monitoring the COVID-19 situation as concerns rise about the virus’s newest version, the omicron variant.

Holcomb said he thinks it’s settling in for people that COVID is “going to be with us for a long time.”

The governor wants to end the state’s public health emergency soon, as long as lawmakers deliver him administrative changes that will ensure Hoosiers don’t lose access to hundreds of millions in federal dollars. And he said the omicron variant doesn’t necessarily change that plan.

“We’re going to have a public health emergency and those executive orders as long as we need it, one way or another,” Holcomb said.

As the virus and its variants fuel fears of a bad winter surge – particularly for hospital systems – Holcomb continues to beat the drum of vaccination.

“First of all, I hope that folks get vaccinated for themselves and for their family," Holcomb said. "Secondly, I hope they think of others, as well.”

Holcomb said the state is constantly working with hospitals to ensure they have the resources they need.

Contact reporter Brandon at bsmith@ipbs.org or follow him on Twitter at @brandonjsmith5.

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