May 29, 2018

Indiana Farmers See Dry Growing Season Start, Hope For Rain

The USDA report says 61 percent of the Indiana's corn crop emerged by the week of May 20. - Pixabay/public domain

The USDA report says 61 percent of the Indiana's corn crop emerged by the week of May 20.

Pixabay/public domain

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (AP) — Indiana farmers are hoping for precipitation to return despite the cold and wet beginning of spring that's caused planting issues.

A May 20 report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture says 88 percent of corn and 73 percent of soybeans in Indiana have been planted.

Vigo County farmer Brad Burbrink tells the Tribune Star that crops need about an inch of rain within the next 10 days in order to flourish. He says the growing season went from cold weather to temperatures reaching 80 degrees or higher.

The USDA report says 61 percent of the state's corn crop emerged by the week of May 20, and 38 percent of the state's soybeans emerged by that date.

Vigo County farmer Terry Hayhurst says farmers are concerned about a lack of rain in May since June is typically dry.

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