December 12, 2019

Indiana Has Mediocre Performance For Election Integrity And Security

Article origination IPBS-RJC
Attorney Bill Groth, center, discusses his election security presentation as Butler Professor Greg Shufeldt, left, looks on.  - Brandon Smith/IPB News

Attorney Bill Groth, center, discusses his election security presentation as Butler Professor Greg Shufeldt, left, looks on.

Brandon Smith/IPB News

Indiana doesn’t have good grades when it comes to election integrity and security.

That’s what a Butler political scientist told Hoosiers Thursday during a panel organized by the citizen advocacy group Common Cause Indiana.

Two recent studies – one by Pew Research, the other from Harvard – put Indiana in the bottom half of states for election integrity. Butler Professor Greg Shufeldt says those studies considered, for instance, voter turnout, waiting times at the polls, mail-in ballots rejected, and campaign finance systems.

“Indiana doesn’t have a grade right now that they would want on their academic transcript,” Shufeldt says.

One troubling part is election security. Shufeldt says the type of electronic voting machine in a majority of Indiana counties – direct record machines, or DREs – poses a threat to voter confidence.

Those machines don’t come with a paper trail – and Indianapolis attorney Bill Groth says the state’s new devices that add a paper trail have other problems.

“They’re susceptible to the introduction of malware and adding a printer to a DRE adds another component that can fail on Election Day,” Groth says.

A Congressional report estimates replacing Indiana’s paperless voting machines would cost about $23 million.

The state currently has about $2.3 billion in reserves.

Contact Brandon at bsmith@ipbs.org or follow him on Twitter at @brandonjsmith5.

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