NewsPublic Affairs / November 22, 2016

Indiana Man Cites Religious Freedom Law For Not Paying Taxes

Rodney Tyms-Bey has argued that the state's Religious Freedom Restoration Act allows him to argue that paying his state taxes is a burden on his religion. He owes about $1,000.Religious Freedom Restoration Act, RFRA, taxes2016-11-22T00:00:00-05:00

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indianapolis man is set to argue before a state appellate court that Indiana's religious freedom law protects him from paying taxes.

The Indianapolis Star reports that 41-year-old Rodney Tyms-Bey's case is scheduled for oral arguments before the state Appellate Court on Monday. Tyms-Bey has argued that the state's Religious Freedom Restoration Act allows him to argue that paying his state taxes is a burden on his religion. He owes about $1,000.

Prosecutors argue that Tyms-Bey can't use the defense because he didn't identify his religion and paying income taxes doesn't burden religious practices.

Tyms-Bey's defense attorney, Matthew Gerber, says a jury should decide if his client has a closely held religious belief.

Others in Indiana have cited the 2015 law as a defense for criminal charges.

 

 

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