September 12, 2021

Indiana Reports First West Nile Virus Case Of 2021

The Indiana Department of Health says mosquitoes are still active in cooler fall weather, and all Hoosiers should take precautions against mosquito-borne diseases until the first hard freeze. - Provided by CDC

The Indiana Department of Health says mosquitoes are still active in cooler fall weather, and all Hoosiers should take precautions against mosquito-borne diseases until the first hard freeze.

Provided by CDC

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — State health officials are asking Indiana residents to protect themselves from mosquito bites after the first West Nile virus case of 2021 was identified in a Lake County resident, and in mosquitoes in multiple other counties.

As of Friday, 83 mosquito pools positive for West Nile virus were detected in Allen, Clark, Daviess, Elkhart, Floyd, Gibson, Hamilton, Jennings, Lake, Marion, Martin, Pike, Scott, Steuben, St. Joseph, Vanderburgh and Vigo counties.

Mosquitoes are still active in cooler fall weather, and all Hoosiers should take precautions against mosquito-borne diseases until the first hard freeze, State Health Commissioner Dr. Kristina Box said in a statement.

Additional West Nile virus activity is expected as the mosquito season progresses, according to the Indiana Department of Health.

Residents across the state are now being encouraged to take proper precautions to reduce their risk of exposure. State health officials recommend avoiding being outdoors from dusk to dawn and in the early morning when mosquitoes are active, applying an EPA-registered insect repellent, covering exposed skin when in mosquito-active places, and discarding containers that can become mosquito breeding sites.

Residents of northern Indiana should also be aware of ongoing increased risk for Eastern equine encephalitis (triple-E) virus, which caused regional outbreaks in the United States in 2019 and 2020, state officials said.

Support independent journalism today. You rely on WFYI to stay informed, and we depend on you to make our work possible. Donate to power our nonprofit reporting today. Give now.

 

 

Related News

One state’s plan to push low-income health insurance beyond traditional health care
Most people who need addiction treatment don’t get it. Yet many state laws limit access
Why pediatricians are worried about the end of the federal COVID emergency declaration