April 28, 2021

Indiana's Top Elections Official Admits Fundraising Error

Secretary of State Holli Sullivan speaks with reporters in a virtual press conference after being appointed to the position.  - Courtesy of the governor's office

Secretary of State Holli Sullivan speaks with reporters in a virtual press conference after being appointed to the position.

Courtesy of the governor's office

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana’s top elections official has acknowledged violating state political fundraising rules with the launch of her 2022 election campaign.

Republican Secretary of State Holli Sullivan requested contributions as she announced her campaign Monday — five days earlier than allowed under changes to state law signed by Gov. Eric Holcomb that day.

Sullivan, who was appointed secretary of state by Holcomb in March and is vice chair of the Indiana Republican Party, said she was seeking a full four-year term to “defend the integrity of Indiana’s elections.”

State law prohibits candidates for state offices from fundraising during the legislative sessions when the two-year state budget is drafted. Lawmakers extended their meeting deadline from the typical April 29 until November so they can return to approve new election districts.

“The Committee to Elect Holli Sullivan has determined that it made an improper solicitation of campaign funds,” Sullivan’s campaign said in a statement. “These public solicitations have been removed and all contributions have been returned.”

State Libertarian Party Chairman Evan McMahon said “If you are vying to be elected to head the office that oversees elections and enforces campaign finance laws it would probably be a good idea to not break those laws."

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