NewsLocal News / November 14, 2018

Noblesville Boy Who Admitted To School Shooting Ordered To Spend Time In Juvenile Detention Center

Noblesville Boy Who Admitted To School Shooting Ordered To Spend Time In Juvenile Detention CenterThe Hamilton County judge leveled the most severe punishment the boy could receive because he was not charged as an adult. Noblesville West Middle School, Noblesville, Hamilton County Superior Court2018-11-14T00:00:00-05:00
Noblesville Boy Who Admitted To School Shooting Ordered To Spend Time In Juvenile Detention Center

People wait in line to get in to the Hamilton County courtroom for Wednesday's disposition for the 13-year-old boy who shot a teacher and classmate at Noblesville West Middle School in May.

Carter Barrett/WFYI

The 13-year-old boy who admitted to shooting his teacher and a classmate at Noblesville West Middle School could serve time in a juvenile detention center until he’s 18.  

The Hamilton County judge leveled the most severe punishment the boy could receive because he was not charged as an adult. He explained his decision saying he didn’t see any remorse or empathy from the boy. 

The 13-year-old's lawyer, Chris Eskew, says he thinks his client will complete the Department of Correction's program before he's 18-years-old. The juvenile's release would be contingent on the completion of a program rather than a mandated length of time. 

Prosecutors said during a recent juvenile court hearing that the teen made a video warning of violence the day before the shooting.  Prosecutors said the boy found the keys to a basement safe in his family's home, unlocked it and removed two handguns and more than 100 rounds of ammunition that he brought to the school in a backpack.

The teen is accused of shooting teacher Jason Seaman and 13-year-old classmate Ella Whistler on May 25, 2018.

WFYI is not identifying the boy because he has been charged and sentenced as a juvenille.

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