October 24, 2016

Leaf Collection Begins Nov. 7 In Marion County

Leaf collection in Indianapolis will begin Nov. 7. - stock photo

Leaf collection in Indianapolis will begin Nov. 7.

stock photo

INDIANAPOLIS -- Fall has arrived, and for many that means raking leaves.

The Indianapolis Department of Public Works will collect leaves in Marion County Monday, Nov. 7 through Friday, Dec. 2. Each household may dispose of as many as 40 bags of leaves each week during the collection window on their regular trash day. Last year, DPW collected over 5,000 tons of leaves through this free program.

DPW is asking residents to follow a few sguidelines:

  • Place leaves in plastic or specially built large paper yard waste bags
  • Place leaf bags outside by 7 a.m. on your regular trash day
  • In cart areas, keep leaf bags at least 3 feet away from trash carts so trucks can access carts

DPW is also reminding residents that any trash left outside of carts will not be collected. Leaves collected this year will be composted at the South Side Landfill and resulting mulch will be available to residents in the spring.

It is illegal for residents to burn leaves in Marion County. Burning leaves creates particles, including dust, soot and other materials, that can contain toxic chemicals. These chemicals can worsen conditions related to heart and lung disease.

Residents should also clear leaves and debris from storm drains to avoid drainage and flooding problems.

Last year, DPW collected over 5,000 tons of leaves through this free program. Leaves collected this year will be composted at the South Side Landfill and resulting mulch will be available to residents in the spring.

 

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