January 10, 2022

Mansion, estate of late businesswoman DeHaan listed for $14M

(Encore Sotheby's International Realty)

(Encore Sotheby's International Realty)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Indianapolis home and estate of the late businesswoman and philanthropist Christel DeHaan has hit the market for $14 million.

The luxurious estate, described in the listing as “almost holy, a true sanctuary,” sits on more than 150 acres that was once the grounds of the Benedictine Monastery of St. Maur.

The plot includes a 41,762-square-foot mansion, a private lake, terraces and formal gardens, and is close to the White River, Butler University and several golf courses.

The home features cathedral ceilings, a spa, outdoor and indoor pools and other amenities, including a tennis court and a 5-plus car garage. The property is owned by CD Realty LLC, according to city property records, The Indianapolis Star reported.

DeHaan, who died in 2020 at age 77, was one of the wealthiest women and most prominent Hoosier philanthropists in the nation. She was born in Germany, where her father was killed during World War II by American bombs, and later emigrated to Indiana.

In 1974, she co-founded the Indiana-based timeshare company Resort Condominiums International, which she sold for $825 million in 1995.

She subsequently embarked on worldwide philanthropic efforts through Christel House International, a nonprofit she founded to assist impoverished children. The organization operates learning centers and schools in India, Mexico, South Africa and the United States.

DeHaan also used her wealth to donate millions to Republican candidates and to the arts. The fine arts center at the University of Indianapolis carries her name.

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