NewsEducation / August 23, 2018

New School Offers College Alternative Education In Tech

New School Offers College Alternative Education In TechA new college alternative in Indiana aims to bring tech education and fill jobs in the Midwest. The school's founder says the school works to train students in practical skills and match them with employers. 2018-08-23T00:00:00-04:00
New School Offers College Alternative Education In Tech

A new college alternative in Indiana aims to bring tech education and fill jobs in the Midwest.

Kenzie Academy is housed in a downtown coworking space, and offers courses on software development, design and marketing.

The school’s founder, Chok Ooi, says the school works to train students in practical skills and match them with employers.

“The whole startup ecosystem is really emerging in the city,” Ooi says. “Right now, where we’re sitting there are so many tech jobs.”

Ooi used to work in San Francisco’s tech startup scene. He says he saw companies moving to the Midwest and the need for skilled employees to fill the new jobs.

Kavita Kamal is in the software engineering program -- she’s a mom of two and wants to re-enter the workforce.

“After you stay at home for a couple years, you lose your confidence,” Kamal says. “I have a masters degree in computer applications so I can learn any language on my own…. I really came here for the practical experience.”

Tuition is $24,000 up front. The school offers a tuition payment plan based on future income.

There are currently 50 students enrolled since it opened early this year. That number is expected to rise in the next few months.

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