August 10, 2022

Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization seeks input on plan to make streets and roads safer

City officials hope to secure new federal funds to make roads and streets safer. - stock photo

City officials hope to secure new federal funds to make roads and streets safer.

stock photo

City officials hope to secure new federal funds to make roads and streets safer.

Central Indiana has already seen an unprecedented number of traffic fatalities in 2022.

The Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization developed a regional Safe Streets and Roads for All Action Plan as a step toward securing federal funding for infrastructure and other initiatives.

Anna Gremling, executive director of the IMPO, said the plan identifies criteria by which projects seeking funds for implementation will be measured.

“Essentially, it's taking data we already had, and compiling it with the help of the public and public input into one plan that lists and identifies a High Injury Network and lists several projects by municipalities in Central Indiana”, Gremling said.

The public can provide input on the plan.

“So, we had public input early on with a survey. But now we're asking the public based on their input originally, and based on all the data, did we get it right? Do they have any additional concerns about the plan, it will be a living document, we'll probably end up updating it next year as well, “ Gremling said.

Comments on the plan are due by 4 p.m. on Aug. 12. The Transportation Policy Committee will consider adopting the plan at its Aug. 17 meeting.

Contact WFYI Morning Edition newscaster and reporter Taylor Bennett at tbennett@wfyi.org. Follow on Twitter: @TaylorB2213.

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