November 8, 2022

Republican U.S. Sen. Todd Young wins re-election bid

Article origination IPB News
U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) first won his seat in 2016, after serving three terms in the U.S. House. - Alan Mbathi/IPB News

U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) first won his seat in 2016, after serving three terms in the U.S. House.

Alan Mbathi/IPB News

U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) won a decisive re-election victory Tuesday as he heads back to Washington for another six years.

Young beat Democrat Tom McDermott and Libertarian James Sceniak.

Young came into the race with several advantages – the boost of incumbency, being a Republican in Indiana and with millions of dollars in his campaign coffers. And he only built that financial lead through the course of the campaign.

As he thanked people on election night, Young talked about earning Hoosiers trust over his next term.

“I’m going to work tirelessly over the next six years to ensure that I live up to your high expectations," Young said. "To ensure that we yield the sort of accomplishments that you deserve. Not rhetoric, but results.”

Young said he’s ready to fight the president’s agenda “wherever necessary” – but also stressed that he’ll work across party lines when he can.

Young’s Democratic opponent Tom McDermott voiced a similar note of bipartisanship in defeat.

“I want you all to know that it's imperative that we get back behind Senator Young and support him and try to move America forward because we got a lot of problems in this country,” McDermott said.

Young first won his seat in 2016, after serving three terms in the U.S. House.

This story has been updated.

Contact reporter Brandon at bsmith@ipbs.org or follow him on Twitter at @brandonjsmith5.

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