May 13, 2020

Seahorse Expert Earns 2020 Indianapolis Prize

Amanda Vincent, who directs Project Seahorse at the University of British Columbia, was the first biologist to study seahorses in the wild, document their extensive trade and establish a project for their conservation. - Provided by the Indianapolis Zoo

Amanda Vincent, who directs Project Seahorse at the University of British Columbia, was the first biologist to study seahorses in the wild, document their extensive trade and establish a project for their conservation.

Provided by the Indianapolis Zoo

A Canadian scientist described as the “preeminent authority on seahorse ecology and conservation” has won 2020 Indianapolis Prize for conservation.

Amanda Vincent, who directs Project Seahorse at the University of British Columbia, was the first biologist to study seahorses in the wild, document their extensive trade and establish a project for their conservation.

Vincent says winning the award allows her to advocate for more attention to the ocean.

“The Indianapolis Zoo is really providing an enormous leadership in conservation and to win the Indianapolis Prize is honestly quite splendid, and means we can have a platform of big issues," Vincent says.

The Indianapolis Zoo, which presents the prize every other year, says seahorses act as flagship species for a wide range of marine conservation issues.

“Dr. Amanda Vincent’s determination to protect our oceans and the species that inhabit it is nothing short of heroic,” says Rob Shumaker, president and CEO of the Indianapolis Zoological Society, which presents the Indianapolis Prize every other year. “Dr. Vincent brings a collaborative, culturally sensitive and solutions-focused approach to ocean conservation. She inspires people to action and drives positive outcomes for marine species. It’s our privilege to recognize and reward her for her immeasurable impact on ocean conservation and the future of seahorses around the world.”

The winner of the Indianapolis Prize receives $250,000.

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