June 21, 2019

U.S. Sen. Todd Young Talks About Relief For Farmers

From left to right: Sarah Delbecq, president of the Indiana Corn Growers Association; Phil Ramsey, chairman of the Soybean Membership and Policy Committee; Sen. Todd Young; and Jane Ade Stevens, CEO of the Indiana Corn Marketing Council. - Emily Cox/WFYI

From left to right: Sarah Delbecq, president of the Indiana Corn Growers Association; Phil Ramsey, chairman of the Soybean Membership and Policy Committee; Sen. Todd Young; and Jane Ade Stevens, CEO of the Indiana Corn Marketing Council.

Emily Cox/WFYI

U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) told Indiana agriculture groups today he’s asking the U.S. Department of Agriculture for clarity on potential disaster relief for farmers.

Heavy rains and floods delayed planting for many corn and soybean farmers this spring. Federal data show only 84 percent of corn was planted in Indiana as of this week. That’s compared to 100 percent last year.

Sarah Delbecq is president of the Indiana Corn Growers Association and grows corn and soybeans in northern Indiana. She says even if farmers do get crops planted, they aren’t guaranteed to yield enough to make a profit.

“The more unknown part is what will we have in the fall to harvest,” Delbecq says. “It’s not a given that once you get it in the ground, that you will have yield that’s sufficient enough to break even.”

Young met with members of the Indiana Soybean Alliance, Corn Growers Association and other groups in Indianapolis. He says the USDA wants to help farmers. 

“My office sent a letter to USDA, encouraging USDA to come up with this clarity soon,” Young says. “They’re working hard to do that.”

Young also criticized House Democrats for not signing on to the president’s proposed trade agreement with Mexico and Canada. He says farmers depend on that market and believes the deal will happen.

“People will represent their constituents, and we will pass President [Donald] Trump’s agreement into law before the end of the summer, but I can’t guarantee that,” Young says.

Young also praised agricultural conservation practices in Indiana.

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