August 20, 2019

Group Calls On Sen. Todd Young To Help Lower Drug Prices

Original story from   IPBS-RJC

Article origination IPBS-RJC
Protesters from Hoosier Action gathered in front of U.S. Sen. Todd Young's (R-Ind.) office in Indianapolis. - Jill Sheridan/IPB News

Protesters from Hoosier Action gathered in front of U.S. Sen. Todd Young's (R-Ind.) office in Indianapolis.

Jill Sheridan/IPB News

Activists rallied against the high cost of prescription drugs, outside of U.S. Sen. Todd Young’s (R-Ind.) Indianapolis office Tuesday. The group wants the senator to lead the way to lower drug prices.

They delivered a call for Young to sign on as a co-sponsor of the Prescription Drug Pricing Reduction Act moving through Congress. The proposal would cap Medicare costs, penalize drug companies if prices rise too fast and force discount transparency.

Hoosier Action member Carrie Fudickar says they also want Young to work with Hoosiers who can’t afford their medications. 

"Big pharma lobbies your politicians to keep drug prices out of reach of the poor, the uninsured and the underinsured," says Fudickar. 

Dr. Katie McHugh says many of her patients struggle to fill their prescriptions. 

"More often than you would believe, my patients come back for their return visit, no better, because they were unable to get the care they needed because of the expense of their medication," says McHugh.

After a fight with her insurance company, Monroe County Hoosier Action member Michelle Higgs received news that her son’s high-priced medicine would be covered – but she had a question. 

"If I’m only paying $45 per month of a $6,523 prescription, who is paying the difference?" says Higgs.

Young’s office hasn't respond to a request for comment.

Indiana lawmakers will study the high drug pricing issue starting next month. 

Contact Jill at jsheridan@wfyi.org or follow her on Twitter at @JillASheridan

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