August 27, 2021

Immunocompromised Hoosiers Should Get Third Dose, State Health Officials Say

Article origination IPBS-RJC
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention's guidance only applies to immunocompromised Hoosiers who received the Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines. - Justin Hicks/IPB News

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention's guidance only applies to immunocompromised Hoosiers who received the Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines.

Justin Hicks/IPB News

State health officials are encouraging eligible Hoosiers to get a third shot of the COVID-19 vaccine. This additional dose is different from the booster shots recently announced by the Biden administration. 

That’s as cases are surging statewide – and likely to get worse in the coming weeks.

Dr. Lindsay Weaver, Indiana Department of Health chief medical officer, said right now, immunocompromised Hoosiers who originally received the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine should get a third dose.

"This includes people who are undergoing treatment for cancer, recipients of solid organ or stem cell transplants, individuals who have advanced or untreated HIV infection and people who are taking certain medications that suppress their immune system," she said.

READ MORE: CDC Recommends 3rd Vaccine Dose For Immunocompromised People


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Weaver said, if possible, get the same brand of vaccine that you originally received, but that Pfizer recipients can get a Moderna booster and vice versa.

The additional dose is available 28 days after an immunocompromised Hoosier got their third shot. The booster shots pending FDA and CDC approval may be available five to eight months after a second dose.

Weaver also said the state’s vaccination clinics are walk-in, and the state is working to add capacity in the coming weeks to ensure sites are prepared to give shots to everyone who needs them.

Contact reporter Brandon at bsmith@ipbs.org or follow him on Twitter at @brandonjsmith5.

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