January 3, 2023

Indianapolis wants to work with state lawmakers on key issues

The city of Indianapolis has a list of issues it would like to work on with state lawmakers on during the 2023 legislative session. - FILE: WFIU-WTIU

The city of Indianapolis has a list of issues it would like to work on with state lawmakers on during the 2023 legislative session.

FILE: WFIU-WTIU

The city of Indianapolis has prioritized issues it would like to work with state lawmakers on during the upcoming legislative session. Many of the topics are not new at the Statehouse.

One issue, that city and state lawmakers often agree on, is the need to fund infrastructure improvements in Indianapolis. City leaders point to an unbalanced state funding formula that doesn’t favor Marion County and burdens local taxpayers. Some suggest adjusting the formula to account for the full population, instead of by fire service territory. Another proposal could change a state grant matching program to benefit more populous counties. 

Another priority is a resolution for housing issues, long advocated for and debated at the Statehouse. The city says inflation and housing shortages make the issue more critical. Suggested legislation could prevent displacement in gentrifying through property tax changes. The city also backs recommendations from the state Housing Task Force, and says it remains committed to tenant rights efforts. 

Last year, the city successfully partnered with the state’s attorney general to resolve issues at a property owned by bad acting landlords.

In a written statement, Indianapolis Mayor Hogsett said more of that collaboration is needed.

“It’s clear that government works best when it works together,” Hogsett said. “I look forward to continued conversations with our partners at the other end of Market Street on these critical issues."

The city would also support any measures or partnerships to address gun violence. Those include expansion of the Indiana Crime Guns Task Force, and funding to stop 3D-printed converters, or “glock-switches,” which convert semi-automatic weapons into fully automatic weapons.

Pointing to the pandemic, the city also prioritizes public health funding and improved food access.

Support independent journalism today. You rely on WFYI to stay informed, and we depend on you to make our work possible. Donate to power our nonprofit reporting today. Give now.

 

Related News

Indiana Civics Summit focuses on youth involvement in local politics, elections
"Not much was working right." Federal and local takeover of Indianapolis Housing Agency announced
IMPD enforces curfew law for children under 18