May 28, 2024

Interstate improvement study looks at 1,100 pieces of community feedback

The study targets areas including bridge safety, mobility and multimodal connectivity. - File Photo / WFYI

The study targets areas including bridge safety, mobility and multimodal connectivity.

File Photo / WFYI

A study to envision interstate changes in Indianapolis is underway, and insights from the latest phase of the ProPEL study were out this week.

In the first phase of the study, INDOT solicited community feedback and received more than 1,100 comments. The new analysis identifies needs based on that feedback and other data.  

The report identifies issues along I-70 and I-65 inside the I-465 circle including the north and south splits. INDOT Communications Director Natalie Garrett said some of the interstates are decades old.

“These segments of interstate need to be addressed in the future so coming to the public earlier in the planning process asking them what are some needs,” Garrett said.

The study targets areas including bridge safety, mobility and multimodal connectivity.

The Planning and Environment Linkage, or PEL, study is a federal program that guides long-term interstate improvement.

Garrett said it’s important to have the most comprehensive plan possible.

“The things that we're thinking about talking about now wouldn't be in construction for five, even up to, you know, 20 plus years,” she said.

INDOT will engage the public by reaching out for ideas and solutions until the end of June.

Transportation upgrades across the whole system include considerations of quality of life, economic mobility and equity.

Contact WFYI city government and policy reporter Jill Sheridan at jsheridan@wfyi.org.

 

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