July 5, 2022

More food funding for Indianapolis neighborhoods

More food funding for Indianapolis neighborhoods

More funding for food assistance is coming to Indianapolis neighborhoods.

Partnership for a Healthier America will grant more than $600,000 for the effort to give 1,000 families fresh food boxes. This is the second summer Indianapolis has benefited from the organization’s Good Food for All program.  

The Indianapolis Office of Public Health and Safety runs the program through its Division of Community Nutrition and Food Policy.  The city will partner with 15 community organizations to distribute the food to residents.  Elizabeth Durden runs the nonprofit Kids Coalition and helped connect the community last summer.

“They’re calling me every week trying to get the vegetable boxes back “when are they coming back?’  huge, huge,” Durden said.

Last year more than 800,000 servings of fruit and vegetables were served to families.

Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett said this program focuses on more than the immediate need.

“Our long term goal is to learn more about larger consumer habits allowing retailers to adapt the overall food system to maximize access to it,” Hogsett said.

Last year the program reported success providing increased healthy food habits to low income residents who have limited health food access. Inflation and high gas prices are making it more difficult for families this summer.

Indianapolis has also committed $6 million in American Rescue Plan money for food security.

Organizations interested in participating may contact OPHS.

Contact WFYI city government and policy reporter Jill Sheridan at jsheridan@wfyi.org. Follow on Twitter: @JillASheridan.

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