August 8, 2022

New Indianapolis city budget proposed to council

Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett, at the podium, presented the 2023 budget proposal to the City-County Council on Monday, Aug. 8. - Jill Sheridan/WFYI

Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett, at the podium, presented the 2023 budget proposal to the City-County Council on Monday, Aug. 8.

Jill Sheridan/WFYI

The proposed 2023 budget for the city of Indianapolis invests in public safety, infrastructure, education and property tax relief. The new operational budget proposal was presented at Monday night’s City-County Council meeting.

The proposed spending is around $1.4 billion, up slightly from last year.  Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett said it’s targeted at the city’s most pressing issues.

“I passionately believe that every level of government must do its part to help residents during these uncertain economic times,” Hogsett said.

Public safety will continue to receive a big chunk, more than $300 million, and includes increased starting salaries and bonuses to recruit more police officers.

IMPD currently has 200 unfilled positions.  The budget will also fund an all clinician led mental health response team.  IMPD Chief Randal Taylor says that will be crucial.

“Twenty-four hour coverage and then to have more than one team that can go out and handle different things,” Taylor said.

Close to $400 million in infrastructure improvements is budgeted as part of $1.1 billion in planned spending over the next five years. That includes more money for residential roads.

Indianapolis Department of Public Works Director Dan Parker said those dollars are also targeted.

“These neighborhoods that councilors selected from their districts have really low pavement index,” Parker said.

Other departments that will see a budget increase include the coroner's office, the courts and the Indianapolis Fire Department.

Hogsett’s proposal also includes a property tax package for homeowners hit hard by the market.

“I am proposing a 2023 property tax credit for the majority of Marion County homeowners,” he said.

That would include a $100 to $150 credit for owners.

The budget provides money to continue tenant legal aid programs but no additional funding for rental assistance.

There is also money in the budget for education programs, including Indy Achieves and a new youth reading effort.

Budget hearings start this week, the council will vote on the budget in October.

Contact WFYI city government and policy reporter Jill Sheridan at jsheridan@wfyi.org. Follow on Twitter: @JillASheridan.

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