July 26, 2018

New Employer-Based Health Clinic Opens In Kokomo

Article origination IPBS-RJC
Gov. Eric Holcomb at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new primary care center for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. - Photo provided by Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Gov. Eric Holcomb at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new primary care center for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles.

Photo provided by Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

A new primary care center in Kokomo will serve more than 22,000 Hoosiers, all employees of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, FCA.  The clinic is part of a growing trend of direct employer provided care. 

The FCA Family Health and Wellness Center is the first domestic automaker to establish a near-site clinic where workers can access care at no or low cost.

Kathleen Neal, FCA director of integrated healthcare and disability, says there were a number of reasons why the company wanted this model.

"The relentless year over year that employers face in providing health care to their employees and families and also the concern about a shortage of primary care physicians," says Neal. 

Neal says that about 40 percent of their employees didn’t have primary health care provider and many used the ER too often. 

The full-service clinic is powered by St. Vincent Health says Dr. Michael Busk.

"We were looking at providing primary care and making it a one stop shop to provide all primary care services for the employees and families of FCA," says Busk. 

The clinic will also include radiology, labs, mental health services and physical therapy. The model is growing across Indiana and the nation.  St. Vincent has about 20 similar sites in Indiana.

The clinic opens July 30. 

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