NewsPublic Affairs / November 8, 2016

Third Parties Work To Rally Support On Election Day

Dennis Everette took the day off of work to campaign for Green party presidential candidate Jill Stein. - Stephanie Wiechmann/IPBS

Dennis Everette took the day off of work to campaign for Green party presidential candidate Jill Stein.

Stephanie Wiechmann/IPBS

The 2016 election has been contentious, with some voters in both major parties not happy with their presidential nominees.  That’s led to third parties rallying for attention, and that did not stop on Election Day.

Because Jill Stein is a write-in for president, you won’t find a Green party candidate listed on a Hoosier ballot. But in Delaware County, Green party members still came out to greet voters at polling locations.

Dennis Everette took the day off of work to sit outside on an overcast, slightly rainy day.  He said he talked to about half-a-dozen people during the busy pre-work hours at his polling place.

“They’ve all been very encouraging, glad to see that I’m fighting the good fight," he said. "Several of those have said that we really need more than two options.”

He said his party’s mission is to remind Bernie Sanders fans that while the Vermont senator is not an approved write-in in Indiana, Jill Stein is.

With candidates for multiple offices on the ballot, the Libertarian party has an easier time with party name recognition.  Official state results for the last presidential election show that about 50,000 Hoosiers voted for Gary Johnson and his running mate in 2012.

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