May 23, 2022

Weather Service confirms 3 tornadoes hit Indiana on Saturday

This screenshot of the National Weather Service radar shows storms moving through Indiana at 3:40 p.m. on Saturday, May 21. - National Weather Service

This screenshot of the National Weather Service radar shows storms moving through Indiana at 3:40 p.m. on Saturday, May 21.

National Weather Service

Three tornadoes, one of which toppled a church steeple at the Indiana National Guard’s Camp Atterbury, hit parts of central and south-central Indiana on Saturday as a wave of severe thunderstorms swept across the state, the National Weather Service said.

A team from the agency's Indianapolis office conducted storm surveys Sunday and confirmed that two EF-0 tornadoes with winds up to 84 mph touched down Saturday, with the first hitting Brown County's densely wooded South Princes Lakes area about 3:40 p.m., uprooting and damaging trees.

The second EF-0 briefly touched down some 10 minutes later in Johnson County in the Indiana National Guard's Camp Atterbury training area, where a church steeple was blown over and several vehicles were lifted by the winds. That tornado also damaged numerous trees.

The third tornado, an EF-1 with winds of up to 110 mph, was confirmed as touching down around 4 p.m., in Shelby County, where it left a path of toppled or uprooted trees nearly 14 miles in length extending from near Edinburgh to near St. Paul.

Meteorologist Andrew White said Saturday’s storms caused no reported injuries.

He said the weather service was still assessing storm damage in Monroe County near the western edge of Lake Monroe to determine if tree damage there was caused by a tornado or straight-line winds.

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