February 10, 2024

Jefferson Shreve to run for Congress after expensive mayoral campaign

Jefferson Shreve in the WFYI studios during the 2023 Indianapolis mayoral race. - Ben Thorp/WFYI

Jefferson Shreve in the WFYI studios during the 2023 Indianapolis mayoral race.

Ben Thorp/WFYI

Former Indianapolis mayoral candidate Jefferson Shreve has filed to run for Congress in Indiana’s 6th district. 

The Republican businessman joins at least four other GOP candidates vying for the seat currently held by Greg Pence. Pence announced last month he would not seek reelection.

In a statement Shreve said he decided to run for Congress because of the need for capable, conservative leadership.

“We have an administration beholden to special interests of the far left, unwilling and unable to defend our border, our pocketbooks and traditional American values. I hope to earn the trust of my fellow Hoosiers to defend those values in Washington," Shreve said.

Shreve spent heavily in the mayoral race last year. More than 93 percent of the $14.4 million came from his own account. In 2022, Shreve sold his storage company for $590 million.

He lost to Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett. In his recent statement Shreve said he ran that campaign to fight interests that have led to lawlessness and crime.

“Those same failed policies are hurting Americans across this country and right here at home — issues like out-of-control spending, inflation and immigration,” Shreve said.

Two months ago Shreve and his wife Mary donated $150,000 to Indianapolis animal groups. At that time he said he had no plans for another run.

Indiana’s primary election is May 7.

 

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