November 12, 2021

Nearly 9,000 Hoosiers ages 5 to 11 receive COVID-19 vaccine in eight days


Article origination Indiana Public Media
There are 608,000 5- to 11 year-olds in Indiana and about 1 percent have already received at least one dose. - Justin Hicks/IPB News

There are 608,000 5- to 11 year-olds in Indiana and about 1 percent have already received at least one dose.

Justin Hicks/IPB News

Listen to the broadcast version of this story

About 9,000 kids ages 5-to-11 in Indiana have already received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine — just eight days after pediatric appointments opened.

There are 608,000 5- to 11 year-olds in Indiana and about 1 percent have already received at least one dose. 

This despite a technical error on the state’s online scheduling platform that caused pediatric COVID-19 appointments to be canceled this week. 

READ MORE: Are COVID-19 vaccines safe for kids? Here's what you need to know


Join the conversation and sign up for the Indiana Two-Way. Text "Indiana" to 73224. Your comments and questions in response to our weekly text help us find the answers you need on COVID-19 and other statewide issues.


The pediatric dose is one-third the size of the dose for Hoosiers 12 and older. Hoosiers ages 5 to 17 can only receive the Pfizer vaccine. 

Parents or guardians can register their children 5 or older at OurShot.IN.gov. If you’re in need of assistance, you can call 211. 



Local health care providers will soon be able to order their own supply of the COVID-19 vaccine for children directly from the federal government.

Contact Lauren at lchapman@wfyi.org or follow her on Twitter at @laurenechapman_.

Copyright 2021 Indiana Public Media. To see more, visit Indiana Public Media.

 

Support independent journalism today. You rely on WFYI to stay informed, and we depend on you to make our work possible. Donate to power our nonprofit reporting today. Give now.

 

 

Related News

Providing free rides could help people in addiction recovery
Indiana youth smoking and drinking hit a 30-year low
Their mentor was attacked. Now young OB-GYNs may leave Indiana